Category Archives: Get into Aviation

SAAF Museum Airshow Youth Development Program 6 September 2019

The South African Airforce Museum Airshow 2019 hosted a Youth Development program on the Friday before the show the following day. One of the exhibit hangers to be precise, Hanger 4 was furnished into a career hall where the youth could get involved and put into the aerospace world with lots of information from all different forms of aviation from the South African Airforce, Private Flight Schools and other aerospace industry’s including Paramount Group, Civil Aviation Authority, Denel and Mango Airlines.


At the same time, learners from different schools got to witness some validation flying from both the SAAF and civilian aircraft that were taking part in the show the following day. This also encouraged learners to be back at the base the next day for the airshow. The enthusiasm from learners expression are sure to be going into the right career path, as the future will have future aviators, technicians and ATCs. 

SAAF Hawk MK120 during a validation flight
Rand Airport based Extra 300 duo

Learners got to have a small piece of flying an aircraft with the SAAFs Impala MKI Flight simulator, where they got to taste the thrill of flying a fast jet.

Impala MKI Simulator
Future Aviator


The Museums display halls were also open for the learners to visit the past SAAF aircraft that are preserved by the museum and friends of the museum. Learners were also informed on the development on locally manufactured aircraft including the Cheetah and Rooivalk projects. 
These days surely invest in our youth in South Africa and will surely make a mark in encouraging the youth to get involved with Aviation. 2020 will be a bigger year for Aviation in South Africa and in the SAAF as our Airforce turns 100 years old.

SAAF Museum P51D Mustang “Pasty Dawn”
Silver Falcons PC7MKII

Click on the link below of the days SAAF Museum Airshow Youth Development Program 6 September 2019

https://youtu.be/iGL6VKef-c4

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Excitement is building for the SAAF Museum Airshow

Excitement is building for the South African Air Force YOUTH EXHIBITION day and the SAAF Museum annual Airshow!

The the South African Air Force (SAAF) YOUTH EXHIBITION day and the SAAF Museum annual Airshow will be held on 06 and 07 September 2019 from 07h30 to 16:00 and 09h00 to 17h00, respectively. These events will take place at Air Force Base (AFB) Swartkop, Old Johannesburg road in Valhalla, Tshwane.

The theme for this year is “Collective Heritage”. The theme appreciates and recognizes the collective and individual sacrifices of the members in pursuit and realisation of the SAAF’s mandate. As the historical aviation hub of the SAAF, the SAAF Museum continues in its efforts by collecting, restoring, preserving and exhibiting the heritage and traditions of the SAAF and military aviation.

The Chief of the SAAF, Lieutenant General Fabian Zimpande Msimang initiated the Project “Embracing our collective heritage” in order to present a holistic history of the Air Force. These records of history include former TBVC (Transkei, Bophuthatswana, Venda and Ciskei) states and the Armed Wings of former Liberation Movements in relation to the corresponding political, social and economic dispensation of the country. One of the fundamental elements in nation-building and cultivating a cohesive society is the reconfiguration of the heritage landscape to ensure that it reflects the diversity, the unity of society and the triumph of a human spirit.

Youth Exhibition is scheduled for 06 September 2019 at 08:00 in Hangar 4. A total of 1000 learners will attend from different schools around Gauteng and other provinces. The following companies are among those that will exhibit on the day:

1. Standard Bank

2. Armscor

3. Mango

4. Aviation Academy (Cabin Crew)

5. South African Air Force

6. Unisa Robotic Department

The SAAF Museum Airshow (07 September 2019) is designed to attract aviation enthusiasts, the general public as well as current and former members of the SAAF, providing an opportunity to celebrate military aviation in both static and flying conditions.

Aircraft: Members of the public can expect to see the following aircraft on the day:

Operational aircraft: Gripen, Hawk, Lockheed C130, Oryx, Agusta 109, Pilatus 12, Rooivalk

Museum aircraft: Allouette II, Allouette III, SA 330L Puma, Harvard, Atlas C4M Kudu, Aermacchi AM 3C Bosbok, Vampire, Cessna 185 and Explora

Also read Mustang Sally’s Return to SAAF museum Airshow

Tickets: Tickets are available at Computicket at R80.00 for adults and R30.00 for children between 12 – 16 years. Whilst tickets will be available at the gate, members of the public are encouraged to buy tickets before coming to the event.

Gates: Gates will open from 07:00 till 17:30. The Air Show starts at 09:00.

Parking: Parking for people with disabilities will be at the North Gate (Corner Old Johannesburg road & Snake Valley Road). The general public will also park alongside Old Johannesburg Road & Snake Valley Road. Although there will be car guards, members of the public are informed that parking will be at own risk.

Traffic congestion & Noise: There will be traffic congestion and significant aircraft noise. We therefore appeal for tolerance and understanding from the public, especially residents of Valhalla, Centurion and other surrounding areas.

Bus Shuttle: Gautrain buses will be available to shuttle people from Centurion and Pretoria stations to the venue. Gautrain cards are required for the use of this service.

Vendors: There will be food stalls and a beer garden. Alcohol will be served at a designated area. Controlled substances are not allowed.

Also read Do’s and Don’ts attending an Airshow

Prohibited items: Drones and UHF/VHF transmitters.

Also remember to read our air show dos and don’ts for general things to remember. The article can be found here.

How do I become aircraft maintenance engineer?

Please Share:

What is an aircraft maintenance engineer and How do I become one?

Firstly, we need to tell you what an aircraft maintenance engineer is and some of the duties required to be performed.

The job of an aircraft mechanic is to keep aircraft operating safely and efficiently. People’s lives are at stake which makes this job extremely important. Aircraft mechanics service aircraft, overhaul engines and parts and test the every-day smooth running of aeroplanes or helicopters.

What does an aircraft mechanic do?
• Conduct safety inspections
• Service aircraft
• Troubleshoot and solve problems
• Overhaul engines and parts
• Repairs parts/ install new ones
• Tests various aircraft systems and engines
• Order parts
• Keeps strict records
• Commits to lifelong learning 

Secondly, it is important to understand the different types of trades available:

  1. Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (Avionician):

An aircraft maintenance engineer (avionician) overhauls, repairs, modifies and tests a range of electrical, electronic, instrument and radio communications and navigation system components in a workshop environment, after they have been removed from the aircraft. Examples of these types of systems would be: generator and power distribution systems, protection systems, autopilot and integrated flight systems, environmental control systems, and radar and communication systems.

  1. Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (Mechanical)

An aircraft maintenance engineer (mechanical) maintains, services, inspects, tests and undertakes fault diagnosis of airframe, engine (including propellers and rotors) and electrical systems, components and accessories on aircraft. Examples of such components are: landing gears; wheels and brakes; skids; pneumatic and hydraulic systems; fuel systems; flight control systems; environmental control and pressurisation systems; fire detection and prevention systems; oxygen systems; containerised cargo handling systems; doors and windows; lighting systems; and ice and rain protection systems.

Thirdly, what is the minimum admission requirements?

18 years and older.
Grade 12/N3 or Equivalent
Mathematics 50% of higher
English 50% or higher

Maths Literacy 50% + will be considered subject to the below​ Applicants that do not meet the course acceptance criteria but do possess a Grade 12/N3 or equivalent certificate will be subject to an aptitude test prior to acceptance and admission to MATA.

What is the Duration of the course?

One (1) Year Basic Training (42 weeks) at the MATA Training Academy (Theory and Practical Training)

What Happens after the first year of training?

Once you have completed your first year:

1. You will have fulfilled the TETA requirement.

2. You will be issued with a certificate

3. You will have practical and theoretical knowledge of the field of study you have chosen.

Thereafter MATA liaison officers will assist with placing you as an apprentice with an Aircraft Maintenance Organisation (AMO)

Unemployed learners placed at an AMO are NOT guaranteed that such AMO will employ you! No tertiary education institution can guarantee job placement!

4. You will then be required to obtain a total of 2 880 hours and a minimum of 18 months of practical experience as an apprentice at an AMO.

These hours must be logged in your logbook (downloadable from the TETA Website) as proof of aircraft maintenance experience, in order to qualify to apply for your Trade Test.

5. After you have applied to TETA and the DHET for your trade test (MATA will guide you through the process and help you to apply)

MATA will conduct a Trade Test Preparation Phase with you prior to your Trade Test Examination Days to ensure that you are adequately prepared for the most important exam in your aviation career. MATA is a certified Trade Test Centre.

Mata Apprentice technical training has been recognized to be the best. Not only by providing top quality instructors and training, but by providing the industry with top quality engineers. Not only has MATA had a 98.8 % pass rate but with our newly approved trade test center, MATA students can be proud to be furthering their careers with a trusted brand. MATA is also a European aviation approved training facility.

Contact MATA:
eMail : info@matasa.co.za

Phone: 011-395-4144

Click on photo to enlarge

Home of Pilatus- Silver Falcons visit Switzerland

“The idea was hatched late last year about getting the team to do an international trip . Switzerland being the home of the Pilatus was a no brainer. For us to be able get to view how and where all the current airframes were designed and built. On May the 3rd, Emirates hauled us through Dubai to Zurich, arriving in the cold that afternoon. Then a train ride from Zurich to Lucerne where we stayed for 3 days. For two days lots of walking around or busing around the sites and sounds of Lucerne.”

“It must be said the bus n train network in Switzerland was brutally efficient and effective. On Sunday May the 6th was a special treat with the visit up Mount Pilatus to be greeted by typical winter weather in Europe with tons and tons of snow. Something one would never see in Langebaanweg. The rest of the day was spent visiting the old town of Lucerne.”

Mt Pilatus at 7000ft
Cold smiles all around
Falcon snow man

“The 6th was the team received special treatment form Pilatus aircraft corporation. The company arranged everything from transport from our mini budget hotel to Stans were the factory is located. Jerome Pörtner played host and guide for and arranged what needed to be needed during our visit. Once at the factory were given two cards, which one was a security clearance and the other a Wi Fi (Switzerland neh ) card.”

“The day began with a presentation about the company and their ethos of how they operate in a niche market, Swiss chocolates were on offer . From there on a factory tour covering everything from how parts are made from scratch to the company latest flagship the pC24 floor. Everything from the paint shop to the tiniest of details.”

The Pilatus Assembly line

“What blew the teams mind away was the special design of the hangers/factory which is made of special wood not the usual mortar n brick or canvas as we are used to back home in RSA. To say one can eat of the floor would not be off the mark. What was not lost to us was how space in general when it comes to aviation is a tricky thing to solve! In all the hangers, airframe after airframe, we squizzed into every corner available (guess the work must continue non the less ) regardless wether it’s the pc24 or pc12 hanger.”

The Team in the Pilatus factory

“Then another treat was the special ‘ground instruction ‘ of the PC21 given to the team by Neil ( ot&e pilot ex RAF) & senior sales man and Pascal and Jerome Pörtner. (One can only dream hey). Then it was lunch at the newly refurbished factory canteen which can be best described as a 3-4 start hotel dining hall. It boast views of all the surroundings mountains around the factory.”

Pilatus PC24s on the apron
The cold kicking in
What a view

“The a very interesting part of the factory is where Central Flying School (CFS) sends their Prat & Whitney engines for overhauling. Where they pull them apart and put them together again. Everyone swelled with pride from the feedback from the engines from the SAAF are always in good condition compared to other users which showcases how the SAAF looks after its equipment.”

Central Flying School Pilatus PC7MKIIs

“Sadly the day flew by and on Wednesday May the 7th, the team repositioned to Zurich to get ready to fly back home. The evening of the 7th was spent visiting the beautiful city of Zurich with a special dinner held In town in one of the most beautiful part of the city and an age old restaurant which used to be an armory during the times (Zeughauskeller) “

One of the restaurants we visited in Zurich

“Special thanks goes out to the Coves aviation community led by JP Fourie of NAC and Luigi Rossi of Internek engineering and Obviously the SAAF for giving team 82 this opportunity.”

Left to Right
Major Sivu Tangana,Major Musa Dlamini,Major Bheki Shabungu,Major Tiaan Stander,Major Omphile Matloane,Captain Xander Albasani and Major Corne van Deventer.

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Little Annie Needs Your Help

“My name is Little Annie. I am an orphan who was donated from Russia and flown all the way to South Africa. I attend most of the air shows throughout Southern Africa . On the day before the air show I take the orphaned and underprivileged children from the area who have never had the opportunity to experience the joy of flight, to give them hope, encouragement and to share my true life story with them. My hope is to inspire them to achieve the seemingly impossible in attaining their dream commensurate with their natural talent. I have flown more than 3000 children since I was adopted by Mark Hill and his family who founded the Just Love Mission Charity. 

I was invited to the Newcastle Air Show on the 1st June for the very first time. This was our first airshow in Kwa-Zulu Natal.My bags were packed, and I was on my way. While flying, I started coughing up oil and my engine made a big bang sound! Fortunately my father and brother were able to land me safely at the Newcastle airport. I was unable to fly in the air show and am too sick to fly back home. The Flying Doctors who work on me and who can get me flying again will need to spend a bit of time and will need to replace a part in my engine.  I am invited to the Mozambique air show in Maputo on the 14th and 15th June, where I will be taking the children from the area flying.  Unfortunately, I will not be able to attend if my Doctors cannot come and fix me. I’d like to ask if there is anyone who will be able to donate towards the medical bills in order to get me up and “running”/flying again.

I will be over the moon if a few ‘Little Annie’ fans can possibly assist me in raising the funds. The good News is that because I  am a regustered NPC and PBO that is B-BBEE rated as well as article 18A registered, it can benefit those with corporate social investment responsibilities and you can also claim a sizable percentage of your contribution back from tax. If you would rather not claim from tax, I will be very excited to give you recognition and exposure for your charitable donations! Please contact my family should you be able to assist: 0817770444 or email on info@littleannie.co.za You can also have a look at my website for more info www.littleannie.co.zaI am excited to possibly hearing from you and hoping that this challenge of me being sick, will be able to be sorted out in order for me to carry on with my passion of sharing flight with the children!

Thank you Kindly!

Contact Details for Donations

081 777 0444 or email on info@littleannie.co.za

Read the story of ‘Little Annie’

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Rand Airport Challenge 2019

A typical summer morning at Rand Airport where most pilots like to take to the skies over Johannesburg and enjoy the beautfual scenary
around the Gauteng Province.

Briefing on the way

Entry’s for the day

This past weekend we attended the first fun Rally for the year and no better place to have it at a busy airport,with the Harvard Cafe
along side the terminal building, pilots and navigators stocked up on a filling breakfast and coffee, they made their way to the airports terminal building for a sharp briefing at 8.30am.A quick photo of every participant in front of what could be a oasis of palm trees shading Rand Airport Tower!

Once the briefing was over the team memebers made their way to their aircraft making sure all routes and refrences marked out so that the best man or women wins.


The SAPFA Committee, particularly Rob Jonkers and Mary de Klerk, who organised a very thorough workshop recently on Rally Flying,  saw their efforts bear fruit at the annual Rand Airport Challenge, when a record 8 teams took part in the Intermediate form of the sport.  In previous years most participants preferred to stick to the simplest and easiest form which is Fun Rally, but this year pilots and navigators were encouraged to enter the more difficult category.  The reason for this, is to elevate their skills levels, so that they can participate at national level, thereby building up a new breed of South African champion rally pilots and navigators.

C172 ZS-DAC


The navigators and pilots in the Intermediate category had one hour to plot the entire route, and had to do so in the cockpit, which was a first for most of them.  They also had far more photo targets to identify, and these were mixed up instead of being sequential and only one per leg. The pilots had only a 5 second window to get through each turn-point, instead of 15 seconds  for Fun.


Organisers Frank and Cally Eckard gave them the task of flying an arc, which is a curved track between two turn-points, and a follow-the-feature, where they have to fly along a road, river or railway line.  Every pilot flew the arc perfectly, and really enjoyed the challenge.

The route took them south from Rand Airport, around Suikerbosrand to Heidelberg, then down to two turnpoints on the banks of the Vaal Dam, and back again near Vereeniging to the Finish Point at Klipriviersberg Nature Reserve.


Rand Airport, who sponsor the Rand Airport Challenge Trophy, also waived landing fees on the days for the participants.  The trophy was won by the defending team of Shane Brits and Karen Stroud, who have been putting a lot of effort into their sport.  

The full results are:

The Fun Rally section:

PilotNavigatorPoints
1RC ShillawCJ Shillaw319
2Thys van der MerweGerda870
3Kim PratleyAndrew Pratley1231
4Piet MeyerPieter Kriel1410

The Intermediate Section:

PilotNavigatorPoints
1Shane BritzKaren Stroud750
2Jonty EsserJonathan Esser967
3Adrian PillingAdam Pilling982
4Don LucasAndre Kluyts1488
5Leon BouttellKaryn Purchase1955
6Mark ClulowRenee Clulow2170

Unfortunately the two teams consisting of Phil Wakely and Mary de Klerk, and Jakes Jacobs and Franz Smit did not complete the course due to mechanical problems.  

The Unlimited Section:

PilotNavigatorPoints
1Rob JonkersMartin Meyer409
2Hans SchwebelRon Stirk766
3Antony RussellPamela Russell1344

Everyone thoroughly enjoyed the challenge of this sport, and are all very motivated to take part in the next events:

  • 1-2 Feb – Cape Speed Rally, Morning Star
  • 16 Feb – Training Day in Brits, with the focus on the role of the pilot, and cockpit-management
  • 23 March – Virginia Rally, Durban (with a training course on 22 March)
  • 4 – 6 April – Rally Nationals, Stellenbosch

Please enter online at http://Sapfa.org.za


SAPFA Rally Training Camp

SAPFA Rally Training Camp – Aerosud Premises 19 January 2019 – by Rob Jonkers

SAPFA held a very successful training event on Rally Navigation on Saturday 19th January as the first SAPFA event of the year. Initially planned for a maximum of 30 participants, and at Grand Central, the eventual total participation was 50, and fitting everybody into the Aerosud training hall proved a challenge.

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Alan Evan Hanes – GM of the Aero Club with a short Aero Club Intro

It is great to see the sport being supported so enthusiastically, and the willingness to learn these basic skills of map reading and planning. The GM of the Aero Club Alan Evan Hanes opened the day with a brief overview of the Aero Club and its functions, that the Aero Club has as its mission to protect all forms of Recreational Aviation, and supports Sections of the Aero Club such as SAPFA to be able hold successful events within the procedures governing recreational aviation in SA.

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The Participants – 50 in total

With that Mary de Klerk took charge and laid out the objectives of the day, by initially going through the theory of plotting, and then to practice on an actual plot. With this year of 2019 having a full calendar of events, and the Nationals coming up in April in Stellenbosch, and with SAPFA having won the bid to host the World Rally Flying Championships in 2020 (which is also the Centenary year of the Aero Club), this training event would serve as an excellent platform to entice new members to the sport and to start training for the Internationals and obtain Protea Colours.

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Mary first started off with having everybody introduce themselves, and what they each had as objectives for training, some were there as newbies interested in taking part in the sport, some having takien part previously indicated they needed some formal and expert training, and some others indicated they just wanted to delve more in depth than what a ppl course would give on the art of paper based navigation.

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The Rally Plotting Class of 2019

From there Mary outlined the theory on plotting procedures and described the tools of the trade. Then it was off to plotting an example course which had to be done from basic plotting principles of co-ordinates, bearings (which could be in either true or magnetic) and distances (either in nm of km). Each turning point then had to be found and identified and linked into legs, some of which could be arcs or follow map features.

The goal in getting to National level standard is to be able to plot in the aircraft with a papers time of around 30-40 minutes prior take-off, which means speed is of the essence in doing the plot, so that the navigator can assist with finding and identifying the ground photos.

The morning’s training ended off at around 11 am, and after a short break, everybody got their first route in an envelope, got the laminated transparent tool, which they had to cut out, and proceeded to plot each of the turn points making up the route. It was decided to proceed right through lunch, and most had finished their plot by after 2pm. The course was ended off with an in cockpit video of one of Rob & Martin’s 2012 rally flights to show how the leg photo features match up with the real world outside to give the perspective of what one sees outside the cockpit from the flying height and distance.

Everybody left with some knowledge gained on plotting and techniques of planning & flying a rally, and it is hoped that many will come to the Rand Challenge on the 26th January and Nationals in April.

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Daniel Ralefeta and his team of Rise Above Aviators getting ready to plot

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Feverously map reading and plotting

The Track shown of Route 2 – an anti-clockwise route

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.

Martin Meyer assisting Dave Thomas

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Mark and Rene Clulow figuring the plot

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Newbies to the sport, Time Scharf, Conrad van Coller and Daniel Ralefeta

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Mary de Klerk assisting Melika Mohapi with Franz Smit & Ashley Loynes at left

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Kim Pratley and his son Andrew Pratley working their plot

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Protea pilot Adrian Pilling and newly minted ppl pilot son Adam learning from the expert

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Arthur Piercy working his plot

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Michael Stofberg & Bryony Martin from 104 squadron

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Virtual Aviators Johan van Wyk and Freek Stegman

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Shaun Barron with Cally Eckard helping in the background

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Rob Jonkers explaining some flying techniques

Eagle Air’s State-of-the-art Flight Simulator

Eagle Air’s new State-of-the-art Flight Simulator

SACAA approved Simulator was launched by Eagle Air Academy based at Wonderboom National Airport South Africa.
The Simulator was acquired at a Cost of few million and has four Aircraft modules build in:

  1. Piper Warrior
  2. Piper Arrow
  3. Piper Seneca
  4. Cessna 425 Turbines

Video courtesy of Fly Media team and Eagle air

5 benefits of flight simulator:

  • Flight simulator allows students to exercise and master specific flight conditions without leaving the ground at all
  • Training that takes place in a simulator is predictable without the interruption of unforeseen delays such a poor weather or mechanical difficulties.
  • When comparing costs, plane simulator training can be more affordable than live flight time, saving costs for fuel, wear and tear and aircraft rental.
  • Student safety is secured during flight simulations allowing flight instructor learners to train under emergency conditions as well as bad weather and technical and mechanical failure.
  • Flight simulators allow students in training the opportunity to practice until perfect, mastering technique and decision making and various stress factors during flight.

The Simulator arrived at the Eagle air facilities at Wonderboom National Airport on 4th October 2018 followed by assembly, Testing and SACAA testing and certification.  The official opening of the new flight simulator was on 25th October 2018 and Percy Rudman that the Rates will soon be announced. South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) certificated the FNTP 2 Flight Device with RNAV and MCC.

 

Bennie du Plessis, a well-known figure in the South African general aviation industry and a keen aviator checking out Eagle Air’s new Simulator.

Eagle Air

Eagle Air also recently add a new Aircraft, a Piper Cherokee registration ZS-KIM to its fleet, This surprising many with the addition of the Simulator shortly after. Read more on How to become a Pilot in South Africa

 

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ATO hosts exclusive school Open Days

ATO hosts exclusive school Open Days

Nelspruit, 11 September, 2018

Almost 30 Hoërskool Nelspruit (NHS) aviation enthusiasts visited the Kishugu® Aviation Training Organisation (ATO) on Friday, 07 September for an opportunity to fly sky high.
NHS was the first of several high schools identified in the Mpumalanga region as part of an aviation career awareness campaign to approach schools directly and address the global pilot shortage.
The aviation industry is one of the fastest growing industries in the world due to rapid growth, but it might not have the pilots available to keep up with this growth.

“To become a proficient pilot, ready to offer a valuable contribution to this dynamic field, takes time,” says Head of Kishugu® ATO, Carel van der Merwe. “Amidst an ongoing wave of retirements and a steady supply of experienced crews is unlikely to be depleted. To fill this gap, the industry showed a great need for quality training academies to help train pilots for the future. And this is where Kishugu® ATO, based in Mbombela, plays a vital role,” says Carel.

After the huge success of sponsoring two pupils for the Mr. and Ms. NHS campaign, word quickly spread among the scholars on the possibilities of starting a career in aviation.

During the NHS open day, students and their parents were welcomed by Carel, and his team of flight instructors, and given a quick pre-flight check before taking to the skies in one of our four aircraft available.
After touching down on the ground, Carel presented a quick informative talk on the options of obtaining your Private Pilots Licence (PPL) and the various ways the flight school could assist parents in making their child’s dream a reality.
With adrenaline still spiking through their veins, the scholars were taken to Kishugu® Aviation FFA AMO 1116, where they got the opportunity to view another possible aviation career option as a aviation engineer. Scholars got to see how these aircraft engineers went to work on the various aircraft types while explaining to the learners what school subjects they chose when they started their careers.
Hannes van Zyl, HOD of FFA AMO 1116, elaborated on the various engineer maintenance careers they could specialise in, from avionics to flight test pilots , all possible when choosing a career as a Aeronautical Engineering. Many of the scholars were even interested in doing shadow work at the AMO during the upcoming school holidays. “Shadowing is the perfect opportunity for learners to get a real sense of what it would be to work on aircraft as a possible career,” says Hannes.

Jayden Joubert, a Grade 12 learner could not contain his excitement after his flight during the open day. “It was such an amazing experience. I never thought this was something I wanted to do with my life, but the flying bug has definitely bitten me,” he says. “The AMO was also very nice to see, especially how organised they were, it was very interesting to see them working on the Huey’s,” he concluded.

“Open days like these offer the best opportunity to young learners to experience exactly what flying entails and if it is a career path they would like to follow,” says Carel. “Many scholars are not always sure what they want to do after school, and experiencing this first hand helps them realise if their heart belongs in the sky.”

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