Tag Archives: CASA

The Spanish Casa

During the late 1960s, the Spanish Airforce was still operating a number of outdated piston-engine transports, including the three-engine Junkers JU52 and Twin Engine Douglas DC3. In order to meet the Spanish Air Force’s needs to modernise its transport force. The CASA proposed the C-212, a twin engine 18 seat transport aircraft that would be capable of fulfilling a variety of military roles, including passenger transport, ambulance aircraft and paratroop carrier, while also being suitable for civil use.

A Casa 212 from 44 Squadron leads a formation of 41 Squadron King Airs during Armed Forces Day Cape Town February 2019.

The first prototype flew on 26 March 1971. In 1974, the Spanish Air Force decided to acquire the Aviocar to update its fleet. The company that now operates the Casa series is now known as Airbus Military.

Portuguese Airforce Casa 212

In 2010, Airbus Military said it could no longer afford to produce the C212 in Europe and after production in Seville slowed to four in two years, the last C-212 produced in Spain was delivered in late December 2012 to the Vietnam Marine Police Over 42 years, 477 aircraft have been produced for 92 operators.

Australian Civil Registered Casa 212-300

The South African Airforce Casa 212 in Service

The SAAF casa 212 and 235 fleet rage from former homelands The Aviocar fleet as inherited in 1994 from the air wings of the former Bophuthatswana (1, 1985), Transkei (2, 1986) and Venda (2, 1988).

SAAF Casa 212 Lowveld Airshow 2018

With 43 Squadron at Cairo West on 12 March 1944 with Avro Anson’s, the squadron began conversion to the Dakota by the end of the month. The squadron was involved in scheduled and unscheduled flights throughout the region and even as far as Rome, Russia, Karachi and the Gold Coast (Ghana). In February 1945 the squadron moved to the Italian port of Bari for operations in the Balkans, including providing support to Yugoslav partisans.

eSwatini Airshow 2019 Casa skydiver drop

The squadrons activities were not confined to the Balkans, with general transport and VIP flights to the south of France, Turkey, Egypt and Britain. The squadron was eventually disbanded at Bari on 6 December 1945.

44 Squadron Casa 212 & 41 Squadron Cessna 208A Caravan, Newcastle Airshow KZN 2011

The squadron was reformed in November 1953 at Swartkop as a transport unit flying Dakotas by renumbering 25 Squadron. The squadron spent a few years at Waterkloof between 1956 and 1963 before returning to Swartkop. Ex-SAA DC-4 Skymasters joining the fleet in 1966. The Vickers Viscount was transferred from 21 Squadron in October 1983 and flew with the squadron until sold in 1991. In 1992, the squadron moved to AFB Waterkloof and re-equipped with Dakotas converted to the C-47TP standard.

Lowveld Airshow 2018
Airforce of Zimbabwe Casa 212
Airforce of Zimbabwe Casa 212 AAD2018

The Skymasters were retired in 1994. During 1998 the C-47TPs were transfered to 35 Squadron when the squadron took over the CASA 212s and CN-235 of the disbanded 86 MEFS. With the disbanding of 42 Squadron in February 2000.44 Squadron took over their Cessna 185’s as well, using them to form B Flight, while the CASAs formed A Flight.

Ladysmith Airshow KZN 2019
South African Airforce & Airforce of Zimbabwe Casas

44 Squadron had a very busy start to the year 2019,as typhoons ripped over the eastern parts of Africa including Mozambique and Malawi.The casa was tasked to take medical and food aid while other contries who also assited at the time.The casa 212 has also been a regular at South African Airshows this year as a jump ship for the Golden Eagles Parachute display team.

Today the Casa 212s still operate out of Airforce Base Waterkloof with the Casa 212 whispering over the field.

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2
  • Capacity: 26 passengers / 25 paratroops / 2,820 kg (6,217 lb) military payload / 2,700 kg (5,952 lb) cargo payload
  • Length: 16.15 m (53 ft 0 in)
  • Wingspan: 20.28 m (66 ft 6 in)
  • Height: 6.6 m (21 ft 8 in)
  • Wing area: 41 m2 (440 sq ft)
  • Aspect ratio: 10
  • Airfoil: NACA 653-218[51]
  • Empty weight: 3,780 kg (8,333 lb)
  • Max takeoff weight: 8,000 kg (17,637 lb) military

7,700 kg (16,976 lb) standard

  • Max Landing weight: 7,450 kg (16,424 lb)
  • Fuel capacity: 2,040 l (540 US gal; 450 imp gal) / 1,600 kg (3,527 lb) internal

and 1,000 l (260 US gal; 220 imp gal) auxiliary fuel tanks in the cabin or 2x 750 l (200 US gal; 160 imp gal) auxiliary fuel tanks in the cabin and/or 2x 500 l (130 US gal; 110 imp gal) underwing auxiliary fuel tanks

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 370 km/h (230 mph, 200 kn) VMO (maximum operating speed) at MTOW
  • Cruise speed: 354 km/h (220 mph, 191 kn) (max cruise) at 3,050 m (10,007 ft)
  • Economical cruise speed: 300 km/h (190 mph; 160 kn) at 3,050 m (10,007 ft)
  • Stall speed: 145 km/h (90 mph, 78 kn) in take-off configuration
  • Range: 835 km (519 mi, 451 nmi) with full military payload
  • Ferry range: 2,680 km (1,670 mi, 1,450 nmi) with maximum fuel and 1,192 kg (2,628 lb) payload
  • Service ceiling: 7,925 m (26,001 ft)

3,380 m (11,089 ft) on one engine

  • Rate of climb: 8.283 m/s (1,630.5 ft/min)
  • Take-off distance to 15 m (49 ft): 610 m (2,001 ft) (MIL-7700C)
  • Landing distance from 15 m (49 ft): 462 m (1,516 ft) (MIL-7700C)
  • Landing run: 285 m (935 ft) (MIL-7700C)

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