Author Archives: Flippie Van Emmenis

Excitement is building for the SAAF Museum Airshow

Excitement is building for the South African Air Force YOUTH EXHIBITION day and the SAAF Museum annual Airshow!

The the South African Air Force (SAAF) YOUTH EXHIBITION day and the SAAF Museum annual Airshow will be held on 06 and 07 September 2019 from 07h30 to 16:00 and 09h00 to 17h00, respectively. These events will take place at Air Force Base (AFB) Swartkop, Old Johannesburg road in Valhalla, Tshwane.

The theme for this year is “Collective Heritage”. The theme appreciates and recognizes the collective and individual sacrifices of the members in pursuit and realisation of the SAAF’s mandate. As the historical aviation hub of the SAAF, the SAAF Museum continues in its efforts by collecting, restoring, preserving and exhibiting the heritage and traditions of the SAAF and military aviation.

The Chief of the SAAF, Lieutenant General Fabian Zimpande Msimang initiated the Project “Embracing our collective heritage” in order to present a holistic history of the Air Force. These records of history include former TBVC (Transkei, Bophuthatswana, Venda and Ciskei) states and the Armed Wings of former Liberation Movements in relation to the corresponding political, social and economic dispensation of the country. One of the fundamental elements in nation-building and cultivating a cohesive society is the reconfiguration of the heritage landscape to ensure that it reflects the diversity, the unity of society and the triumph of a human spirit.

Youth Exhibition is scheduled for 06 September 2019 at 08:00 in Hangar 4. A total of 1000 learners will attend from different schools around Gauteng and other provinces. The following companies are among those that will exhibit on the day:

1. Standard Bank

2. Armscor

3. Mango

4. Aviation Academy (Cabin Crew)

5. South African Air Force

6. Unisa Robotic Department

The SAAF Museum Airshow (07 September 2019) is designed to attract aviation enthusiasts, the general public as well as current and former members of the SAAF, providing an opportunity to celebrate military aviation in both static and flying conditions.

Aircraft: Members of the public can expect to see the following aircraft on the day:

Operational aircraft: Gripen, Hawk, Lockheed C130, Oryx, Agusta 109, Pilatus 12, Rooivalk

Museum aircraft: Allouette II, Allouette III, SA 330L Puma, Harvard, Atlas C4M Kudu, Aermacchi AM 3C Bosbok, Vampire, Cessna 185 and Explora

Also read Mustang Sally’s Return to SAAF museum Airshow

Tickets: Tickets are available at Computicket at R80.00 for adults and R30.00 for children between 12 – 16 years. Whilst tickets will be available at the gate, members of the public are encouraged to buy tickets before coming to the event.

Gates: Gates will open from 07:00 till 17:30. The Air Show starts at 09:00.

Parking: Parking for people with disabilities will be at the North Gate (Corner Old Johannesburg road & Snake Valley Road). The general public will also park alongside Old Johannesburg Road & Snake Valley Road. Although there will be car guards, members of the public are informed that parking will be at own risk.

Traffic congestion & Noise: There will be traffic congestion and significant aircraft noise. We therefore appeal for tolerance and understanding from the public, especially residents of Valhalla, Centurion and other surrounding areas.

Bus Shuttle: Gautrain buses will be available to shuttle people from Centurion and Pretoria stations to the venue. Gautrain cards are required for the use of this service.

Vendors: There will be food stalls and a beer garden. Alcohol will be served at a designated area. Controlled substances are not allowed.

Also read Do’s and Don’ts attending an Airshow

Prohibited items: Drones and UHF/VHF transmitters.

Also remember to read our air show dos and don’ts for general things to remember. The article can be found here.

Rostec to unveil latest Russian military aircraft to foreign partners at MAKS 2019

August 19, 2019
Press-release

Rosoboronexport (part of the Rostec State Corporation) will make presentations of the Russia’s latest combat and transport aircraft at the MAKS 2019 International Air Show.

“MAKS is a traditional platform for aviation premieres. This year, Rostec’s display includes 250+ new models of aircraft, avionics, aircraft engines and airfield equipment, including over 40 items that are being showcased at MAKS for the first time. I am sure these products will attract a lot of attention of our foreign partners,” said Rostec CEO Sergey Chemezov.
The Su-57E fighter (manufactured by KоAAP named after Yuri Gagarin) and the Il-112VE military transport (built by VACM) will be the centerpieces of the military part of Russia’s display at MAKS 2019.

MAKS 2019

“At MAKS 2019, Russian manufacturers will be unveiling the fifth-generation Su-57E multi-role fighter jet and the Il-112VE light military transport aircraft, the hottest and most anticipated new products of recent years. Rosoboronexport is ready, at the request of foreign partners, to present these aircraft and turn a new page in promoting state-of-the-art aircraft systems in the world market. I’m sure the interest in them will be massive,” said Alexander Mikheev, Rosoboronexport’s Director General and Deputy Chairman of the Russian Engineering Union.

The advanced Su-57E fifth-generation fighter jet from Sukhoi (a subsidiary of the United Aircraft Corporation) and the Il-112VE light military transport aircraft from Ilyushin (a subsidiary of the United Aircraft Corporation) have received the necessary export permits and Rosoboronexport has the right to offer them to foreign customers.

The Su-57E is a fifth-generation multi-role aircraft system designed to accomplish a wide range of missions against air, ground and surface targets. It can be used in any weather, day or night, and in a severe jamming environment.

Its main advantages compared with 4th generation aircraft systems are stealth due to a reduced radar and infrared signature, high immunity of both avionics and aircraft armament system, as well as a strong supersonic cruise capability.

SU 57

At the same time, the latest Russian fighter surpasses 4++ generation aircraft in terms of key properties:

  • multi-mission capability;
  • automation and AI technologies incorporated into target engagement processes;
  • all-azimuth and multiple target capability, the use of long-range precision-guided weapons;
  • super-maneuverability.

The set of features of the Su-57E fighter gives it superiority over the fifth generation aircraft available on the market today at a lower life cycle cost. This fact has been recognized by many world experts in weapons and military equipment.

The Il-112VE light military transport aircraft is the export version of the Il-112V developed for the Russian Air Force and intended for the transportation and airdropping of cargo, vehicles, equipment, ammunition and personnel.

IL 112

The major competitive advantages of the Russian Il-112VE light military transport aircraft are:

  • versatility enabling a wide range of transport missions, including airdropping of cargo and special forces groups, transportation of personnel with organic weapons, delivery of weapons, ammunition and materiel, casualty evacuation, etc;
  • state-of-the-art avionics that makes it possible to perform combat missions day or night, in any weather and in different climatic conditions;
  • the dimensions of the cargo compartment of the Il-112VE expand the capabilities for transporting cargo, including self-propelled and non-self-propelled equipment;
  • the Il-112VE is equipped with two new higher-power and more fuel-efficient engines, the TV7-117ST, and AV112 propellers controlled by a single automatic control system which increases flight safety and provides high take-off and landing performance allowing the aircraft to be operated from short runways, including unprepared fields;
  • on-condition maintenance of the Il-112VE obviates the need for major overhauls, which ensures that the required level of equipment operational readiness is maintained at minimum operating costs within the service life limit of 30,000 flight hours or for 30 years;
  • the presence of advanced handling and drop equipment on board the aircraft that allows loading and unloading without the use of additional special equipment;
  • compliance with ICAO flight accuracy and safety;
  • capability to operate independently, including from unimproved airfields.

Rosoboronexport is the only state-owned arms trade company in the Russian Federation authorized to export the full range of military and dual-purpose products, technologies and services. It is a subsidiary of the Rostec Corporation. Founded on 4 November, 2000, now Rosoboronexport is one of the leading world arms exporters to the international market. Its share in Russia’s military exports exceeds 85 percent. Rosoboronexport cooperates with more than 700 enterprises and organizations in the Russian defence industrial complex. Russia maintains military technical cooperation with more than 100 countries around the world.

State Corporation Rostec is one of the largest industrial groups in Russia. It comprises over 700 scientific and production entities in 60 regions of the country. Rostec’s key business areas include transport machine building, electronics, medical technologies, chemistry and innovative materials. Rostec’s holding companies form three clusters: the Radioelectronics cluster, the Weapons cluster and the Aviation cluster. Rostec’s portfolio includes famous brands such as AVTOVAZ, KAMAZ, Concern Kalashnikov, “Russian Helicopters”, Uralvagonzavod, etc. Rostec takes an active part in implementation of all 12 National Projects. The company is a key supplier of Smart City technologies, carries out digitization of the government, industry, social sector, and prepares plans for developing 5G wireless technologies, the industrial Internet of Things, big data and blockchain systems. Rostec is a partner of the world’s leading manufacturers such as Boeing, Airbus, Daimler, Pirelli, Renault, etc. The corporation supplies its products to more than 100 countries. Export of high-tech products provides for almost a third of the company’s revenue.

Pilot Insure Secunda Navigation Speed Rally

The Pilot Insure Secunda Navigation Speed Rally – 10 August 2019 by Rob Jonkers

This Speed Rally held at Secunda on the 10th August was the finale of the 2018/19 season, and the 6th in the series, where it had returned to the birth of the Speed Rally concept just under a year ago. This format of rally has gone from strength to strength with increasing entrants and popularity, with an initial entry list of 23 to over 40 at its peak at the Bethlehem event in June 2019.

This being the season finale, the season winners were to be crowned on Saturday at the prize-giving at the Secunda club. The Secunda club went all out to make this a memorable event, and between SAPFA and the club had also arranged Video recording teams to follow the preparation and the event’s proceedings. The entries started out at 40, but some competitors dropped out due to technical issues, and by Friday morning 32 entries were confirmed.

Club Chairman Hardie Voges made arrangements for food on site, accommodation and providing local members to assist with officiating. Some of the officials arrived early Friday to prepare the course and finalize the entries and their handicaps, where test flights were done throughout the day.

This event is one that is flown at full speed under handicap conditions, the course is around 125 nm long, has 11 or so turning points, with each turning point identified with a correct photograph. For this event the route was mostly to the northeast of the airfield, not in the most scenic part of the country, which is mostly dotted with power stations and coal mines, but then the competitors would have been more concerned about keeping track than looking at scenery.

The weather on Friday started out real well, as the competition director flew in as a first arrival at 8 am with virtually no wind and with a warm day unfolding, but by noon the wind started to pick up and became gusty in the late afternoon with a severe temperature drop, this being due to cold front moving through skirting the east coast. Arrivals started to pick up in the afternoon, and with four new teams, Mary de Klerk provided some dedicated training for these teams.

Thereafter at 18h30, Jonty Esser as the Race Master introduced Rob Jonkers who took to the stage and provided a briefing on what to expect for the next day in terms of the planned route, how many turnpoints, distance, departure and arrivals protocol, and also how the scoring system would world work with expected weather conditions, which looked like early morning low cloud cover but lifting towards the middle of the day.

Race Master Jonty Esser then took to the stage in his signature competing crew introductory theme song videos and race number handouts, and also including introductions to the event and team sponsors. With increasing popularity, more and more sponsors have come on board, and there are now 6 teams being sponsored by entities all vying for the teams to obtain top honors in winning, the latest being The Airplane Factory sponsoring the Sling team of David Ross & James Braid, and Beegle micro trackers sponsoring the team of Johan Whiteman & Quinton Kruger. A scrumptious braai was laid on by the club to end the evening with around the fire stories on a high note.

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For Saturday the briefing started at 8h30, which was a shortened version just to cover the basics of the route, radio procedures and weather. An opportunity was provided by the Speed Rally main sponsor Pilot Insure of the benefits of Aviation Life Insurance cover for pilots, followed by Beegle Micro Trackers, who provided some information on available flight trackers using the Iridium Satellite system, and would be tracking 6 aircraft in the rally to watch their progress on a screen in the clubhouse, that would provide spectator value to the event. The weather turned out to have low cloud develop in the north west, and some teams could not arrive in time to take part with most of Jhb & Pta showing rainy and IMC conditions, but as the morning wore on, the weather improved, although the wind started to pick up from the north as well.

With the briefing over, teams prepared their aircraft, while the organisers got the papers ready. Each team would then receive an envelope with a map, turnpoint photos, a minute marker and a GPS logger to record their track. Aircraft were then also scrutineered with all portable electronic devices sealed up in bags. For this event Century Avionics were on hand to also block off Aircraft GPS systems for those who volunteered.

Scrutineers Chareen, Lizelle, Karen, Conrad and Alex were on hand to seal up all portable GPS capable devices, and also handing out papers at the allotted time, and also checking the fuel tanks were full. To assist the teams at getting their take-off roll accurate, a starting colour panel was used, which was set up next to the start line on the runway by Chief Marshal Jacques Jacobs and Mark Clulow, who would release them at their allotted time slot. Each team then received their envelopes with their loggers at their 20 minutes prior take-off time, and then taxi to the starting line within 10 minutes of take-off time. 1st take-off was at 10h40 for the slowest aircraft and last take-off at 11h10, with planned arrival at 12h00.

With all the competitors off towards the south west, the route had a mix of easy and challenging turnpoints. In general the competitors found the course easy enough this time round, with the photographs now in larger format to identify the ground features more prominently, which can be seen in the results where many had a clear round in their tracks. At just before 12 noon, the first aircraft over the line was the Harmony ZU-FWS with Leon Bouttell and Martin Meyer, followed 10 seconds later by two Slings with half a second between them followed by Jonty & Jonathan Esser’s C150. Within 2 minutes there were 15 aircraft over the line and within 6 minutes the remainder of the field, showing that less competitors had missed turnpoints or went wandering too far off course, however with the wind picking up, the first off and slower aircraft gained more speed on the downwind home stretch to clip their handicap speeds.

After all teams having returned, the scoring team got to work to analyse the results, completing the individual scores by 3 pm, and then readied for the evening prize giving. The prize giving initially started with the MC Jonty Esser everybody involved in the Speed Rally series for the contributions, this was followed by Rob Jonkers showing some interesting tracks for the day. Thereafter certificates and medals were handed out to competitors and officials that contributed to the success of the events held over the last year. For this the final in the season, the overall winners with the best handicap speed was Leon Bouttell & Martin Meyer in their Harmony ZU-FWS, in second place were first timers Johann Horn & Deidre Batchelor in their Sling ZU-WMM, and in third place father and son Hendrik & Jandre Loots in their Sling ZU-IHK. The first twenty placings were the only crews who managed a clean penalty free round.

Final overall Handicap Results

Position Race nr A/c reg Aircraft Pilot Navigator
1 1 ZU-FWS Evektor Harmony Leon Bouttell Martin Meyer
2 26 ZU-WMM Sling 2 Johann Horn Deidre Batchelor
3 6 ZU-IHK Sling 2 Hendrik Loots Jandre Loots

Final overall Track Accuracy Results

Position Race nr A/c reg Aircraft Pilot Navigator
1 3 ZU-JAR Sling 2 David Ross James Braid
2 7 ZS-ACA Cirrus SR22 Ryan Shillaw Chris Shillaw
3 15 ZS-OZI Citabria Bob Cohoe Johann van Niekerk

Championship Final Results

Ranked Championship Points Pilot Navigator Aircraft Reg
1 1000 Leon Bottell Martin Meyer Evektor Sportstar Plus ZU-FBJ
2 935 David Ross James Braid Sling 2 ZU-JAR
3 885 Phil Wakeley Mary de Klerk C210 ZS-CNY

The winners in the accuracy category were the team of David Ross & James Braid in a Sling ZU-JAR, in second place was father & son Ryan & Chris Shillaw in a Cirrus SR22 ZS-ACA, and in third place Bob Cohoe & Johann van Niekerk in an American Champion Citabria ZS-OZI.

The overall season winners were Leon Bouttell & Martin Meyer with 1000 points, David Ross & James Braid with 935 points and in third place Phil Wakeley & Mary de Klerk with 885 points. For the entire series, there were 85 teams that competed over the 6 events.

Many thanks to the Secunda Aero Club for hosting this fantastic event, the SAPFA team of Jacques Jacobs with the ground marshals, Nigel Musgrave as the Safety Officer, Dirk and Louna de Vos and Mark Clulow doing the scoring with our handicapping guru the honorable Chester Chandler, Marc Robinson with his team from Century Avionics for Scrutineering, Chareen Shillaw, Lizelle Kruger handing out competition papers to the crews as well as Scrutineering, Jonty & Lizelle & Sandy for putting together an awesome Friday evening launch event. Thanks also extended to Santjie White of the ARCC who always watches over us, and the ATNS team for managing the ATC for the weekend.

Also to the sponsors Pilot Insure, who was the main sponsor of the event, Flightline Weekly for sponsoring the race numbers, team sponsors Excel E&I – Leon Bouttell and Martin Meyer, The Airplane Factory – David Ross and James Braid, Pilots Post – Phil Wakeley and Mary De Klerk, Pilot Insure – Jonty and Jonathan Esser, Beegle Micro Trackers – Quintin Kruger and Johan Whiteman, Prompt Roofing – Leon Joubert and Sandi Goddard.

ZS-OZI – third in the accuracy results

One of the tracks having gone a little pear shaped.

Photos by Charmaine Oliver Photography, Click here to view here Facebook page

Click To Enlarge photos

FIRE AT HANGAR NO. 8 AT AIR FORCE BASE SWARTKOP

MEDIA STATEMENT

DATE: 10 August 2019

EMBARGO: None

SUBJECT:     FIRE AT HANGAR NO. 8 AT AIR FORCE BASE SWARTKOP

The South African Nation Defence Force (SANDF) hereby confirms that a general-purpose hangar at Air Force Base Swartkop, which did not house any aircraft or museum artefacts, caught fire this Saturday, 10 August 2019 at around 5:00 am. Though there is extensive and structural damage to the hangar, there were neither human injuries nor fatalities.

The cause of the fire is still unknown. The Base Fire Services and the Tshwane Fire Services managed to extinguish the fire to prevent further damages to other vehicles and equipment.

The SANDF with the support of the Tshwane Fire Services will immediately initiate a Preliminary Investigation and/or a Board of Inquiry to determine the cause and extent of the fire.

The majority of the hangars of AFB Swartkops are classified as “heritage structures” because this was the first established air force base in South Africa. The Base and the hangars were built from the early 1920s.

This loss of the hangar is a setback to the South African Air Force and the history of Military Aviation worldwide. Since 2012, the Chief of the South African Air Force, Lt Gen FZ Msimang, has initiated a programme to preserve and promote our Air Force history, which includes former TBVC states and the Armed Wings of Former Liberation Movements in relation to the corresponding political, social and economic dispensation of the country under the theme “embracing our collective heritage”. One of the fundamental elements in nation-building and cultivating a cohesive society is the reconfiguration of the heritage landscape to ensure that it reflects the diversity and the incredible efforts of the unity of our society.

We are grateful for the prompt response of the City of Tshwane and the Air Force Base Swartkop Fire Services.

                    ENDS

Issued by: Defence Corporate Communication

(Defence Headquarters)

Pretoria

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MARITZBURG MODEL AIRCRAFT CLUB SCALE DAY 2019

MMAC Scale day

Sunday, 21 July 2019, Maritzburg Model Aircraft Club hosted the 2019 edition if the annual Scale Day. The day was a perfect winter’s day with clear blue skies. This made it a winning combination with fantastic radio control flying. 
Aircraft that participated ranged from Fighter Jets, Helicopter with bambe bucket, WW1 & WW2 aircraft, Civilian aircraft, Aerobatic Aircraft and a Glider!

Pilot briefing commenced at 08h30 with a nice turn out of pilots. All factors needed to make this a good and fun filled day was in place and the day turned out spectacular with some stunning flying.

A big Well Done to all the pilots for their fantastic displays and to MMAC for making Scale Day 2019 a Good One.  Food was proved in the food tent which was well attended by all on the day Well Done! 

Aircraft and Pilots

John Dorse
1/5 Boeing P26 Peashooter

Rhys and Ryan Mason
1/8 Puma
1942 Stuka

Dean Halley
1/5 FW190 30cc
J3 Piper Cub 30cc
ASH 25 Glider

Clive McInnes
1/4 Fokker DR1
Yak 11

Leon Coetzee – flown by Jason Barker
Beechcraft T6 Texan II
Lavochkin LA-7
1/7 Junkers 87B Stuka

1/4 Nieuport 28
Built by Neil Allen in 1986 and flown by Neil on the 2019 scale day.

Johan De Lange
1/5 Nieuport 11 (1915)
Dalotel MD 165
1/12 L39 Albatross

Andrew Marshall
Extra 300SC

Richard Steel – Flown by Mark Savage
P40 Warhawk
Fockewulf

Mark Savage
Mitsubishi Raiden

Ian Drennan
Ventus 2C

Eric Bell
1/7 Eurofighter
Extra 330
1/6 Hunter

Trevor Dickinson
1/7 Spitfire Mk9

Allan Sneedon
1/4 Clipped wing cub. 120cc

Craig Lipsett
Habu edf jet

About Maritzburg Model Aircraft Club

The club has been in existence for about 60 years; the previous site was at the old Oribi airport and has been at the current site for 36 years.

The current chairman is Johan De Lange who has been chairman for the last 5 years. The club has 60 paid up members.

Flying takes place normally on Wednesdays, Saturday and Sundays. This is a very social club and regularly hosts a “bring and braai” days on the first and last Wednesday of the month.

The airfield has two tar runways with a very large area either side which is mowed and has a very long run off area. This serves as a grass runway in 2 directions. The club has an awesome view of the surrounding area. There is a makeshift toilet, but the club does not have running water but can make a plan if water is required.

All sorts of aircraft are flown at the club. The airfield is also used occasionally for large scale aerobatics. Day visitors are allowed as long as they are fully paid up SAMAA members.  

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How do I become aircraft maintenance engineer?

Please Share:

What is an aircraft maintenance engineer and How do I become one?

Firstly, we need to tell you what an aircraft maintenance engineer is and some of the duties required to be performed.

The job of an aircraft mechanic is to keep aircraft operating safely and efficiently. People’s lives are at stake which makes this job extremely important. Aircraft mechanics service aircraft, overhaul engines and parts and test the every-day smooth running of aeroplanes or helicopters.

What does an aircraft mechanic do?
• Conduct safety inspections
• Service aircraft
• Troubleshoot and solve problems
• Overhaul engines and parts
• Repairs parts/ install new ones
• Tests various aircraft systems and engines
• Order parts
• Keeps strict records
• Commits to lifelong learning 

Secondly, it is important to understand the different types of trades available:

  1. Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (Avionician):

An aircraft maintenance engineer (avionician) overhauls, repairs, modifies and tests a range of electrical, electronic, instrument and radio communications and navigation system components in a workshop environment, after they have been removed from the aircraft. Examples of these types of systems would be: generator and power distribution systems, protection systems, autopilot and integrated flight systems, environmental control systems, and radar and communication systems.

  1. Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (Mechanical)

An aircraft maintenance engineer (mechanical) maintains, services, inspects, tests and undertakes fault diagnosis of airframe, engine (including propellers and rotors) and electrical systems, components and accessories on aircraft. Examples of such components are: landing gears; wheels and brakes; skids; pneumatic and hydraulic systems; fuel systems; flight control systems; environmental control and pressurisation systems; fire detection and prevention systems; oxygen systems; containerised cargo handling systems; doors and windows; lighting systems; and ice and rain protection systems.

Thirdly, what is the minimum admission requirements?

18 years and older.
Grade 12/N3 or Equivalent
Mathematics 50% of higher
English 50% or higher

Maths Literacy 50% + will be considered subject to the below​ Applicants that do not meet the course acceptance criteria but do possess a Grade 12/N3 or equivalent certificate will be subject to an aptitude test prior to acceptance and admission to MATA.

What is the Duration of the course?

One (1) Year Basic Training (42 weeks) at the MATA Training Academy (Theory and Practical Training)

What Happens after the first year of training?

Once you have completed your first year:

1. You will have fulfilled the TETA requirement.

2. You will be issued with a certificate

3. You will have practical and theoretical knowledge of the field of study you have chosen.

Thereafter MATA liaison officers will assist with placing you as an apprentice with an Aircraft Maintenance Organisation (AMO)

Unemployed learners placed at an AMO are NOT guaranteed that such AMO will employ you! No tertiary education institution can guarantee job placement!

4. You will then be required to obtain a total of 2 880 hours and a minimum of 18 months of practical experience as an apprentice at an AMO.

These hours must be logged in your logbook (downloadable from the TETA Website) as proof of aircraft maintenance experience, in order to qualify to apply for your Trade Test.

5. After you have applied to TETA and the DHET for your trade test (MATA will guide you through the process and help you to apply)

MATA will conduct a Trade Test Preparation Phase with you prior to your Trade Test Examination Days to ensure that you are adequately prepared for the most important exam in your aviation career. MATA is a certified Trade Test Centre.

Mata Apprentice technical training has been recognized to be the best. Not only by providing top quality instructors and training, but by providing the industry with top quality engineers. Not only has MATA had a 98.8 % pass rate but with our newly approved trade test center, MATA students can be proud to be furthering their careers with a trusted brand. MATA is also a European aviation approved training facility.

Contact MATA:
eMail : info@matasa.co.za

Phone: 011-395-4144

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The Big 5 Fly-in 2019

The Big 5 Fly-in 2019

The Big 5 Fly-in 2019

Many house-hold-name festivals and events started small and are now annual calendar entries in people’s diaries. We have identified a specific need to small aircraft pilots and aim to provide them with an annual event to exceed all expectation and which is positioned to be uniquely different. Our dream is to grow the Big 5 Fly-in to a national event reaching pilots and enthusiasts across South Africa.

We did not have any money when we set out to host this event in lieu of raising funds, and all marketing was done through social media and word-of-mouth only.

On Saturday 15 June 2019, 19 small aircraft touched down on the airstrip at Legend Golf and Safari Resort, 17 more than our first attempt when bad weather in August 2017 prohibited planes from flying.

Our venue sponsor Legend Golf and Safari Resort went out of their way in helping with the day’s logistics and we couldn’t have asked for a more enthusiastic team.

The skydiving and tandem jumps were a huge draw card for both participants and spectators – thank you so much Johannesburg Skydiving Club. You came as a club but left as very good friends!

Altus Theart’s unplugged concert ended off the day on a high note as the sun set behind the Waterberg escarpment. Both Nadia and Altus were great sports, and their support in our effort is greatly appreciated…. Thank you both for your love, enthusiasm and great ideas for 2020!

Despite a few things we will do differently, our activity and participating sponsors congratulated the Big 5 Fly-in team for a day well organised and we already started planning the 2020 Fly-in around a cosy fire on Saturday night.

Without the financial and product contributions from our sponsors we could not have hosted the Big 5 Fly-in:

Airport Refueling Services, Altus Theart, (NvR Management), Air Traffic Control, Authentic African Adventures, CdP Auctioneers, Chillersonwheels, ER24, Johannesburg Skydiving Club, KH – all things creative, Lanzerac, Legend Golf & Safari Resort, Lex and Christo Erasmus, Nkwe Security Services, The Pallet Kraft, Postnet, Restonic, Sanlam, Rhino Beetle Gin, Televonic, Vleis Sentraal, Wappoint and Working on Fire.

“Opportunity favours the bold – this is a lesson that I learned early on, and have used to guide the Virgin story. If somebody offers you an amazing opportunity but you are not sure you can do it, say yes – then learn how to do it later!” – Sir Richard Branson

The Big 5 Fly-in 2019Many house-hold-name festivals and events started small and are now annual calendar entries in people’s diaries. We have identified a specific need to small aircraft pilots and aim to provide them with an annual event to exceed all expectation and which is positioned to be uniquely different. Our dream is to grow the Big 5 Fly-in to a national event reaching pilots and enthusiasts across South Africa.We did not have any money when we set out to host this event in lieu of raising funds, and all marketing was done through social media and word-of-mouth only. On Saturday 15 June 2019, 19 small aircraft touched down on the airstrip at Legend Golf and Safari Resort, 17 more than our first attempt when bad weather in August 2017 prohibited planes from flying. Our venue sponsor Legend Golf and Safari Resort went out of their way in helping with the day’s logistics and we couldn’t have asked for a more enthusiastic team. The skydiving and tandem jumps were a huge draw card for both participants and spectators – thank you so much Johannesburg Skydiving Club. You came as a club but left as very good friends!Altus Theart’s unplugged concert ended off the day on a high note as the sun set behind the Waterberg escarpment. Both Nadia and Altus were great sports, and their support in our effort is greatly appreciated…. Thank you both for your love, enthusiasm and great ideas for 2020!Despite a few things we will do differently, our activity and participating sponsors congratulated the Big 5 Fly-in team for a day well organised and we already started planning the 2020 Fly-in around a cosy fire on Saturday night.Without the financial and product contributions from our sponsors we could not have hosted the Big 5 Fly-in: Airport Refueling Services, Altus Theart, (NvR Management)Air Traffic ControlAuthentic African Adventures,CdP Auctioneers Chillersonwheels,ER24, Johannesburg Skydiving Club, KH – all things creative, Lanzerac, Legend Golf & Safari Resort, Lex and Christo ErasmusNkwe Security Services, The Pallet Kraft, Postnet, Restonic, Sanlam, Rhino Beetle Gin, Televonic, Vleis Sentraal, Wappoint and Working on Fire.With many thanks and much appreciation.The Koedoesrand Big-5 Fly-in team. “Opportunity favours the bold – this is a lesson that I learned early on, and have used to guide the Virgin story. If somebody offers you an amazing opportunity but you are not sure you can do it, say yes – then learn how to do it later!” – Richard Branson

Posted by Koedoesrand Akademie on Saturday, 22 June 2019

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Warbirds Over Swartkop 2019

Warbirds Over Swartkop 2019

By Dian Townsend

This year’s annual Warbirds Over Swartkop was held at Air Force Base Swartkop. The event span two days with Saturday being the busier of the two. On Saturday we saw Warbirds like the P40 Warhawk, Corsair, Bell UH-1, Eurofighter Typhoon, T-6 Harvard, Pilatus PC-21 and many more. The day had very little breaks in flight and continued until about 16h00. Sunday was much quieter with only about 10 aircraft flying, but the pilots made sure to impress none the less.

Saturday was certainly a good day for the spectators with the Viper Jet, Eurofighter Typhoon and Pilatus PC-21 being the biggest crowd pleasers. Later in the afternoon the two T-6 Harvards joined forces to put on a good aerobatic formation display. Sunday started with the sound of a second Viper Jet firing up it’s engine, followed by a couple  more jets and some smaller aircraft. Arguably the main event for the day, the Extra 300 display. Exhilarating knife edge flybys, inverted passes and  very low hovers.

This event made for a great family outing. The Windsock Café was open for lunch on Saturday, once again serving tasty sandwiches at a very reasonable price and there were two pavilions right on the crowd line providing a good seating spot. Spectators are also allowed onto the actual apron/ taxiway. Something you don’t normally see at airshows. It is recommended that small children are always accompanied by an adult as there were some pretty expensive aircraft in attendance and there is no barrier dividing the apron and runway.

This event was a first for me, but definitely not a last. Photographing these small aircraft is no easy feat, but serves as great practice for bigger airshows. It was awesome talking to many more of the people in our wonderful aviation community here in South Africa. The pilots are very passionate about their aircraft and love talking to the younger crowd and showing them around their aircraft.

This weekend was a great success for the organisers and pilots who attended. There was no dull moment with talented pilots flying their hearts out and even the occasional spill on landing or take off.  There was a wide spread of aircraft ranging from jets to warbirds, aerobatic planes and even a couple of helicopters. This event has once again proven to be one for the 2020 calendar and we look forward to seeing what next year’s Warbirds Over Swartkop has in store for us!

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The Pilot Insure Bethlehem Speed Rally

The Pilot Insure Bethlehem Navigation Speed Rally – 8 June 2019 by Rob Jonkers

The South African Power Flying Association held a very successful Speed Rally at Bethlehem on 8th June 2019, this one being the 5th in the speed rally series started in 2018. This event is going from strength to strength, attracting more and more participants, this time round the first 30 entries were snapped up within hours and when the entries were increased to 40 to accommodate the local clubs, there were another 10 entries within days, where a waiting list had to be started.

The Pilot Insure Bethlehem Speed Rally 2019

Aircraft and Crew list 

Pilot Navigator Registration Aircraft
Eduard Scholtz  Johannes Streicher ZU-RVI Van’s Aircraft RV-10
Leon Joubert  Sandi Goddard ZU-LNC Lancair ES
Rhett Shillaw  Ryan Shillaw ZS-ECK Cessna 182H
Simon Abbot  Chris Shillaw ZS-ACA Cirrus SR22 G5
Quintin Kruger  Johan Whiteman ZS-FVV Piper PA-28-235C
Phil Wakeley  Mary de Klerk S-CNY Cessna 210
Eugene van Staden  Gary Whitecross ZU-IBH Airplane Factory Sling 4
Jaco Breytenbach  Neil Claassen ZS-SVW Cessna T210L
Ryan Beeton  Franz Smit ZU-EYP Van’s Aircraft RV-7
Sarel van der Merwe  Paul Potgieter ZU-ACI Piaggio P.166S
Jaco Goosen  Carel du Preez ZS-KNX Cessna R182 RG II
Mubarak Manaf  Alex Mubanzo Barichelo ZS-MMD Piper PA-34-220T
Ron Stirk  Von Hammon ZS-NBT Cessna A150M
Thys vd Merwe  Gerda Pienaar ZU-AFP Cessna 172D
Leon Bouttell  Martin Meyer ZU-FWS Evektor-Aerotechnik Harmony
Mobin Mohamed  Enock Musasizi Kazimba ZS-CBU Piper PA-28-180B
Ala Buserwil  Tintswalo Mabunda ZS-SMB Cessna 172K
Bennie du Plessis  Barry de Groot ZS-IJL Beech K35
Hendrik Loots  Jandre Loots ZU-IHK Airplane Factory Sling 2
Johan van Eeden  Cor Esterhuizen ZU-IHH Van’s Aircraft RV-7A
Jonty Esser  Jonathan Esser ZU-BLL Cessna 150C
Nicholas de Wit  Philip Jacobs ZU-MRW Van’s Aircraft RV-10
David Ross  James Braid ZU-JAR Airplane Factory Sling 2
Zwelihle Zondo  Madi Duba ZS-EKI Piper PA-28-140
Bob Cohoe  Johann van Niekerk ZS-OZI American Champion 7-GCBC
Wayne van Rooyen  Almero Calitz ZS-MOI Piper PA-32R-301T
Gerrit Coetzee  Liesel Coetzee ZU-BPI KFA Bush-Baby 500
Piet Meyer  Adrienne Visser ZU-DUU Jabiru J400
Eric Addison  Antoinette Addison ZU-LAX Van’s Aircraft RV-7A
Shaun Barron  Steven Watkins ZS-PLE Cirrus SR22 G2
W Uys  Franz Maeder ZU-FVA Jabiru J430
Riccardo Baruffa  Munaf Sayyed ZS-PED Cessna 172M
Adenola Daniel  Igun Nkosinathi Fanti ZS-MKZ Piper PA-28-160
Phillip Austin Shaune Fryer ZU-KGV Flight Design CTSW

The Bethlehem Club went out of their way to make the organizing an easy affair, with Club Chairman Philip Jacobs making arrangement for food on site, accommodation and providing local members to assist with officiating. Some of the officials arrived early Friday to prepare the course and finalize the entries and their handicaps, where test flights were done throughout the day. This event is one that is flown at full speed under handicap conditions, the course is around 125 nm long, has 11 or so turning points, with each turning point identified with a correct photograph. For this event the route was mostly to the south of the airfield hugging the Drakensberg mountains in places

The weather was absolutely pristine, with hardly any wind and no clouds throughout the day, with Saturday being predicted to be the same. As an institution as part of the Speed Rally is that Mary de Klerk provides a training session in the afternoon, but with many teams already becoming well versed in this, Mary provided some dedicated training to teams.

Thereafter at 18h00, Jonty Esser as the Race Master introduced Rob Jonkers who took to the stage and provided a briefing on what to expect for the next day in terms of the planned route, how many turnpoints, distance, departure and arrivals protocol, and also how the scoring system would world work with expected weather conditions, which looked as if it would be good.

Then all the competitors were treated to a briefing on Steroids on Friday night with the Speed Rally Race Master Jonty Esser having set up a show for the teams, with a real life lights, camera, action sequence, where each team were introduced with their team theme song, handed their race numbers. Jonty also introduced the teams to the Speed Rally website where a Speed Rally ranking system was created, with team profiles and their leaderboard position. The evening ended with a braai hosted by the Bethlehem Aero Club, before retiring for the night.

For Saturday the briefing started at 8h00, which was a shortened version just to cover the basics of the route, radio procedures and weather. With the briefing over, teams prepared their aircraft, while the organisers got the papers ready. Each team would then receive an envelope with a map, turnpoint photos, a minute marker and a GPS logger to record their track. Aircraft were then also scrutineered with all portable electronic devices sealed up in bags. For this event Century Avionics were on hand to also block off Aircraft GPS systems for those who volunteered.

The intent is that everybody uses the basic skills of navigation plotting and flying, and operate as a team in terms of cockpit workload, and with the course layout with short legs it for sure makes the crew resource work sharing all the more important. The idea would be that each crew would receive a pre-plotted map already complete with the route, turning points, headings, altitudes, where the map would not have any lat/long or grid references. This would be provided 20 minutes prior take-off to allow route orientation and the plotting of minute markers.

In this format, there are two objectives, fly against a pre-determined handicap speed for each aircraft, and fly the shortest route around the course which would consist of a minimum of 10 turning points, and any aircraft would be able to compete, from slower LSA aircraft to the fast turbo singles or twins. The idea would be to test the speed capability and navigation skills of each crew against each other, where the most accurate flying and turn performance management would win the rally.

Scrutineers Chareen, Lizelle, Ashleigh and Jan-Paul were on hand to seal up all portable GPS capable devices, and also handing out papers at the allotted time, and also checking the fuel tanks were full. To assist the teams at getting their take-off roll accurate, a starting colour panel was used, which was set up next to the start line on the runway by Chief Marshal Jacques Jacobs and Mauritz du Plessis, who would release them at their allotted time slot. Each team then received their envelopes with their loggers at their 20 minutes prior take-off time, and then taxi to the starting line within 10 minutes of take-off time. 1st take-off was at 10h20 for the slowest aircraft and last take-off at 10h45, with planned arrival at 11h30.

With all the competitors off towards the west, the route had a mix of easy and challenging turnpoints to contend with to give competitors a chance to always be aware of where they were, but some turnpoints were a challenge find, especially if the colour of the surrounding ground features had changes since the photos were taken. In general the competitors found the course difficult this time round, and this is visible in the results with many turn point misses, there will be a few improvements that will be made with planning a route. It appears that the final chicane turnpoint remained elusive for many.

At virtually exactly 11.30 the first aircraft over the line was the Sling of ZU-JAR, but unfortunately had missed two turnpoints, thus were out of the running as a winner. They were closely followed by the rest of the pack, all of the teams having arrived within 7 minutes.

After all teams having returned, bar a Sportcruiser that lost its propeller and had to do a forced landing, the scoring team got to work to analyse the results, and with the new loggers were able to complete the scores by 2 pm, given that there was an increase in the number of competitors, whereby everybody were given their score sheets. After this there was prize giving, which first started off with showing some tracks of how many got lost around the course.

The overall winners in the best handicap speed were the team of Eduard Scholtz and Johannes Streicher ina RV10 ZU-RVI, in second place was Leon Joubert and Sandi Goddard in a Lancair ZU-LNC, and in third place Rhett and Ryan Shillaw in a Cessna 182 ZS-ECK. The first fourteen placings were the only crews who managed a clean penalty free round.

The winners in the accuracy category were the team of Leon Bouttell and Martin Meyer in a Evektor Harmony ZU-FWS, in second place was Quinton Kruger and Johan Whiteman in a PA28-235 ZS-FVV, and in third place Simon Abbot and Chris Shillaw in a Cirrus SR22 ZS-ACA.

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Many thanks to the Bethlehem Aero Club for hosting this fantastic event, the SAPFA team of Jacques Jacobs with the ground marshals, Nigel Musgrave as the Safety Officer, Dirk and Louna de Vos and Mauritz du Plessis doing the scoring with our handicapping guru Chester Chandler, Marc Robinson from Century Avionics for Scrutineering, Chareen Shillaw, Lizelle Kruger handing out competition papers to the crews as well as Scrutineering, Jonty & Lizelle for putting together an awesome Friday evening launch event. Thanks also extended to Danie Heath of the ARCC who was our first port of call on the force landing of the Sportscruiser to get the Search and Rescue function activated and the link into the CAA, for sure at these types of events we need our guardian angels.

Also to the sponsors Pilot Insure, who was the main sponsor of the event, Flightline Weekly for sponsoring the race numbers, also to Pilot’s Post for sponsoring the team of Phil Wakeley and Mary de Klerk, and provided three key reasons for this, the first one being that the Speed Rally as a brand is seen as the future of competitive flying, second being that the Speed Rally brand will add value to our brand, third being that they believe that Phil and Mary are the perfect ambassadors for Pilot’s Post and they will carry our flag high.

ZU-LAX – taking the scenic route along the Drakensberg

One of the better tracks of the day – ZU-IBH

Final Overall Handicap Results Bethlehem 2019

Final-Overall-Accuracy-Results Bethlehem 2019

Final Overall Accuracy Results Bethlehem 2019

Final Overall Handicap Results Bethlehem 2019

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2019 Presidential Inauguration

The 2019 presidential Inauguration took place at Loftus Verseveld stadium in the city of Tswane. South Africa’s newly appointed president his excellency President Cyril Ramaposa was sworn in on Saturday 25th May 2019.

Pretoria residents might of noticed a lot of South African Air force activity days before the ceremony, operating from Airforce base Swartkop and Waterkloof.

Aircraft types that were seen during the days flypast on the 25th consisted of both museum and current air force assets.

Aircraft types flown
SAAF Museum

Puma
Alouettes IIIs
Vampire
Cessna C185
Bosbok
Kudu

Current SAAF Types
Hawk
Gripen
C130BZ
Casa 212
Cessna Caravan C208
Pilatus PC12
Beechcraft KingAirs
PC7MKIIs
Silver Falcons
Boeing BBJ
Dassualt Falcon 50
Dassualt Falcon 900
Rooivalk
Oryx
Lynx
A109
Bk117

South African Airways
2 x Airbus A340

Photos below from various Friends of Aviation Central.
ORTIA Planes spotter, Peter Cronje, Johan Stephens, Dries Beetge and Andre Nel.
Big thank you for your continues support and Willingness to share your photos and love for Aviation with us.

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