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Africa Aerospace and Defence Airshow programme

Africa Aerospace and Defence Airshow programme

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AAD Airshow Programme 22 Sept 2018

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AAD Airshow Programme 23 Sept 2018

 

 

SAAF Museum Flying Day 2018-08-04

SAAF Museum Flying Day 2018-08-04

The August winds brought the first flying day of the month of August,we were delighted to be invited to go fly in the SAAF Museum SA330 Puma helicopter, the sole surviving airworthy Museum Puma.We got airborne at 9.45am routing towards the east of Hartbeespoort Dam and the we headed back towards the Pretoria CBD, before landing back at AFB Swartkop.

SAAF Museum Puma Helicopter

Passenger View in the Puma Helicopter

Overhead Pretoria

The Flying day kicked off with some of the Pretoria Military Skydiving Club jumping out the Atlas C4M Kudu,as the skydivers made their way safely back towards the earths surface.Museum and Harvard club Harvard’s buzzed the skies above Swartkop with their usual distinct sound.Both the Alouette II and III flew towards the other side of the base,known as Snake Valley, practicing both auto rotation and hovering skills.

Museum Harvard

Alouette II

Alouette III

Puma Helicopter

The Bosbok, Kudu and the Museums two Cessna 185s,continued until the end of the flying days proceedings with circuits. This is all in the interest of giving current SAAF pilots the feel of the old compare with the newer aircraft pilots get to fly these days.

Atlas Kudu

Cessna 185

Cessna 185

The Spitfire Restoration was present with giving the opportunity for the public to help restore the Museums Spitfire. South African National Parks were also present and showing their support of our National parks and how they trying to combat the terrible rhino poaching occurring in the Kruger National Park.

The Windsock Café filled the tummies of many happy visitors of the Museum, where there is no charge to get into the Museum, only a donation that’s goes to keeping the South African Airforce Historic flight in the skies.

AFB Swartkop Tower

Well done to the Museum on a safe flying day, and to the Museums OC and Base OC for allowing us to fly on the Museums Puma Helicopter. We look forward to the next flying day in September as we get closer to AAD2018 at AFB Waterkloof from the 19-23 September. Until then

“Keep them up where they’re belong”

By Jarryd Sinovich ( Hawk Eye )

SAAF Museum Flying Day 2018-07-07

The first weekend of July, The SAAF museum hosted their annual monthly flying day at Airforce Base Swartkop in Pretoria. Probably one of the colder flying days we have attended and a good X-wind blowing across the field many of the Museum fixed wing aircraft were using the Grass runway towards the Snake Valley side of the base.

Harvard Club

Visitors from all over came to support the museum, as a small donation upon entry into Swartkop that’s goes to maintaining the Museums aircraft fleet and restoring future projects. The Windsock was busy with their filling breakfast, lunches and a piece of memorabilia for purchase to take home.

These flying days also give the public and opportunity to visit the Hangars and get up close and personal with past aircraft and the history of the South African Airforce. Its also a chance for volunteers to help rebuild or donate to the Museums Spitfire restoration and getting involved with the friends of the museum. And for the adrenaline junkie, one can go fly in a Harvard at a reasonable price at the Harvard Club of South Africa.

Museum Harvard

The SAAF Fire and Rescue crew opened the proceedings with a runway inspection, before the Atlas C.4M Kudu got airborne with the Golden Eagles Parachute Team. Most of the Museum Harvard’s and the odd Harvard Club machines took off and completed a series of currency flights and flips for the day. The Museum Choppers like the Alouette II and lonesome Puma were out and about also busy with currency flights and flipping.

SAAF Firetruck

 

Atlas Kudu

Museum Alouette II

A former workhorse of 44 Squadron the Cessna 185 also took to the skies and was joined by the Museums second C185 former 42 squadron bird. Most of the Museum Flying Exhibits should be seen at AAD2018 later this year. The closer we get to the 19-23 September 2018 we will see more flying from the Museum Flying days to come.

Cessna 185

Well done to the hard working ground crew keeping the museum aircraft in flying status, also giving up their Saturday to be on standby at the Museum. We look forward to the next flying day in the first week of August. Till then…..

 

 

“Keep them up where they belong”

The Noisy Bushbuck,The AM.3C Bosbok

The Noisy Bushbuck, The AM.3C Bosbok

The AM.3 used the wing design of the Aermacchi AL-60 utility aircraft, strengthened to incorporate two hardpoints. The fuselage was a new design.
The first prototype, constructed by Aermacchi, flew on 12 May 1967, and it was displayed at the Paris air show in June that year.The second prototype, constructed by AERFER, flew on 22 August 1968, but the aircraft lost the Italian Army contract to the SIAI Marchetti SM.1019. Nevertheless, Aeritalia continued development.

Above-Bosbok over the bush

The third prototype used a more powerful Piaggio-built Lycoming GSO-480-B1B6 in place of the original Continental GTSIO-520-C, and this variant was designated AM.3C
Pilot and observer are accommodated in tandem positions, and the craft features dual controls. Aft space is utilitarian, providing space for two stretchers or seat space for additional passengers. Additional configurations include freight transport.


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Above-Bosbok Cockpit

The Bosbok came to the fore during military operations in SWA and Angola during the late 1970s and 1980s. The aircraft was used extensively on the border and several were shot down during the course of the war. One of the best known exploits by a Bosbok and its pilot was that of Captain Danie Laubscher when he was awarded the Honoris Crux medal for bravery. After several unsuccessful attempts to neutralize a particular anti-aircraft emplacement which was hampering the Army’s advance captain Danie Laubscher dived down low on the target to make sure it was effectively marked with his 68 mm smoke rockets. Despite being fired at by 23 mm anti­aircraft cannon, he actually wiped out the site with his own marker rockets.

Above-Bosbok ZU-ADM Nylstroom 2016

The 40 AM.3C’s were delivered between May 1972 and December 1974 and were allocated the serials 920 – 959. The aircraft was given the name Bosbok by the SAAF. The first Bosbok to be produced for the SAAF made its debut at the Turin Air Show in 1972, although it still wore its Italian civil registration (I-TAM). The variant operated by the SAAF was the AM.3CM version which had provision for four NATO M-4A stores attachment points. The inner points were stressed for 375 lb (170 kg) and the outer points for 200 lb (91 kg) loads. During its service with the SAAF the Bosbok was operated by 41 and 42 Squadrons, usually operating from Potchefstroom but also from Lanseria and numerous airfields in northern SWA.

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Difference between the Bosbok and Atlas C.4 Kudu

The original aircraft were delivered in a matt light grey finish with dark grey serials and anti-glare panel. This was soon replaced by a wrap-around olive drab and dark earth scheme. The defense cuts of the early 1990’s lead to the retirement of the Bosbok from SAAF service in 1992.

 

Above-SAAF Museum Bosbok with 41 Squadron markings.

42 Squadron

The squadron was first formed in Bari, Italy during World War II on 23 January 1945. Many of the pilots were selected from the South African Air Force and given extra training to prepare the pilots for their artillery-spotting duties. The flight flew Auster aircraft in Europe. The flight relocated often as they moved from base to base in Europe as the German forces retreated from Italy until the end of the war. At the end of the war, 42 AOP Flight and their Auster aircraft were shipped back to South Africa and were based at Potchefstroom, home of the SA artillery. The flight’s first two army pilots that were not taken from the SAAF were trained at Central Flying School SAAF during 1949.

n the 1950s, the SAAF was given control of 42 Flight and the flight became 42 Squadron SAAF. 42 Squadron received Auster AOP9 and Auster AOP6 aircraft between 1953 and 1957. In May 1962, the Cessna 185 aircraft entered service with 42 Squadron and the Austers were phased out. In 1974, the Atlas Bosbok was added to the fleet, and later, the Atlas Kudu was then added to the squadron.


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Today

with the Atlas bosbok being withdrawn from service in 1992,most of the aircraft were sold to private individual’s.The SAAF Museum operates two aircraft which are seen at the regular flying days and Pretoria based airshows. More aircraft are flying across the rest of the country for fun flying.

See the Bosbok at the SAAF Museum Airshow 2018 click here

 

 

SAAF Museum Flight Training Day Feb 2018

SAAF Museum Flight Training Day, Feb 2018


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03 January 2018 saw the 1st SAAF Museum Flight training day. All Pilots, Museum staff, Support & Ground crew as well as the public was out in full force after a two-month break. We attended the Pilots briefing and had a nice chat to the Officer Commanding and Media Liaison officer of the SAAF museum about the Upcoming SAAF museum Airshow and the Monthly flight training days.

Pilots, Museum staff, Support & Ground crew

Pilots, Museum staff, Support & Ground Crew

The day was highlighted with two passes from the Silver Falcons Aerobatic Team. The passes included the backup aircraft and making this a very rare 6 sip formation. The Falcons took from Waterkloof Air Force Base to fly back home to Langebaanweg after AF Day Parade flypast.

6 Ship Silver Falcons Aerobatic Team

6 Ship Silver Falcons Aerobatic Team

When is the Monthly flight training day normally held?
This is normally on the 1st Saturday of every month unless otherwise notified by the OC of the SAAF museum. The Next flight training day will be on 03 March.
This day is being used to keep the Pilots current on the Museum Aircraft and keeping the Aircraft in the air by doing the necessary flying hours needed to keep the airworthy.

Museum Aircraft

Today we had the Friends of the Museum out with their Boerewors rolls, Spitfire Restoration Project and more Museum affiliated stands and displays. The Windsock, an very popular restaurant at the museum was also busy with long queues. Airboss for the day was the very competed Lt. Col. Francois Hanekom (Hosepipe).

Museum Aircraft

Museum Aircraft


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The Museum hat almost all serviceable aircraft out flying today and Putting this all together the day after the Air Force Day Parade on the same base was an excellent achievement by the Museum staff.
We at Aviation Central has been given the official “OK” to promote the SAAF Museum Flight Training days and the SAAF Museum Airshow 2018 so be sure to pop back to our Website or Facebook site on Airshow updates.

Click on photos below to enlarge